What to see and do in Marrakech


Marrakech had long been on my list of places to visit so when I finally got to grace the intriguing city I was in awe.  My what a city it is. The smells, the rose coloured walls and buildings,  the culture, the winding never ending streets and the hecticness all just add to to the charm of this Moroccan gem of a city.

Marrakech is the 4th largest city in Morocco and a hugely popular travel destination. It’s a city of the unexpected. You will see new things in every step and if you know me you know one of my top travel tips is to get lost and I can assure you this is something you will do in Marrakech whether you’re like it not. Don’t even attempt looking at a map that won’t help you here. Not at all!

There is so much to see and do and this is a city that caters to everyone’s taste no matter what you are looking for in a holiday.  There is the Atlas Mountains dominating the views, the desserts to wander in, souks full of shopping delights, food so good you may only ever want to eat Moroccan for the rest of your life, sunrises that replenish the soul and street scenes that make you feel a million miles away from your daily life on your regular high streets.

So what do you need to do when you visit this magical city? Well let me tell you my top pics


Eat. Like all the food.

Moroccan food is AMAZING. You don’t even need to go to the most expensive places to get the good stuff. There are so many restaurants and cafes and I can assure you after sampling the tagines and couscous you will still remember the taste sensations years after. There is lots of street food on offer and as per any street food just be a bit cautious, you don’t want to miss your holiday because you are stuck in the loo.


Visit or take in the views of the Atlas Mountains

These breathtaking mountains dominate the views around Marrakech. Considering how close they are it’s also a popular day trip or several day trip option from Marrakech. Hiking, camping or even staying in luxury travel options it’s a must when you are in the city.


Drink mint tea

The best drink you can have in Marrakech. I didn’t even miss my old faithful English Breakfast. I liked it so much I even tried to find the mint tea back in the UK but nothing compared to the real experience.


Watch the sunrise over the city

This goes down as one of my all time favourite moments. Standing on top of our Riad with my gorgeous friends watching the sunrise over the city,  Atlas mountains in the distance and the call to prayer playing out to call in the morning. Well worth getting up for it. Still, makes me have goosebumps even now.

Visit Jardin Majorelle

If you didn’t think Marrakech was colourful enough already then you need to visit Jardin Majorelle.  A beautiful luscious tropical garden, bubbling water fountains, a vibrant blue villa and ties to Yves Saint Laurent what’s not to like.


Jemaa el Fna

This is the heart of the Marrakech and has to be a must visit on any itinerary. There is so much going on that you’ll need to keep your eyes open to take it all in. Snake charmers, monkey trainers, street food stalls, street performers and music playing through the square. It’s a truly intriguing experience and one you don’t want to miss.


Enjoy the rooftops views

So I’ve already mentioned the sunrise from the roof but there are many other roof top views to enjoy. Cocktails while watching the sunset, the views over the sprawling Medina, the snow capped Atlas mountains, women going about their daily business. Looking out and down with a bird’s eye view is a great way to take in the delights of the city.

Pack for the heat in the day but have layers for the evening

It’s hot there, especially in the day. Out of respect for the Moroccan culture and Islamic religion try to dress respectfully especially if you’re in public places. Save the skimpy clothing for sunbathing on the riad roof.  Also be aware when the sun goes down it can go off chilly so always have layers on hand.


Stay in a riad

Riads are like little-hidden paradise. So unassuming from the outside but as soon as you walk through the door and are greeted by the serenity you actually consider never leaving the tranquil oasis. A riad is a traditional and common style of accommodation in Marrakech and which usually has a courtyard, garden, pool (or all 3!) in the centre of the building surrounded by rooms. They often also have roof top which is good for sunbathing, eating breakfast in the sun or watching the sunrise (see point above). There is a lot of them to choose from in the Medina and some include spa facilities so do have a look around. The contrast of relaxing in the riad after a day of exploring in the Medina is one you would never really appreciate until you are there.

Visit a Hammam

I know getting scrubbed and washed by a person you don’t know probably isn’t  on most peoples to do list for a holiday unless you are maybe on one of those 18-30s singles holidays but I can assure you trying a Hammam on your trip to Marrakech certainly should be considered. It is such an interesting experience you come out feeling the cleanest and freshest you ever have been in your life. They also use to much argan oil that you make you want to purchase it by the bucket load before you leave the country.


Meander in the Medina

So many alleyways it’s like a labyrinth that you’ll ponder (more than one) if you’ll ever make it out the other side. Full of restaurants and cafes, animals, market stalls selling an array of trinkets and fresh produce. Walk till your feet are sore and your senses have exploded.


Haggle in the souks

Now haggling just feels a bit odd for us westerners. We see a price in a store and we pay that price. This is not the way in Marrakech. Especially if you are shopping in the souks. The price they give you initially will be extremely inflated so you need to get your negotiating skills on and do some haggling. Stay strong, know your price and know when to walk away.

For more ideas of what to see in Marrakech and wider Morocco – http://www.visitmorocco.com/en

Now go and enjoy your trip you lucky darlings!

Why you need to visit Papirøen when in Copenhagen 

Copenhagen is expensive there is no denying that. But foods food and girls gotta eat. Almost every blog I read prior to coming to Copenhagen mentioned Papirøen so naturally, this was something firmly on the ‘to visit’ list. There had to be something behind the hype.

Papirøen (Paper Island) is a small island in the harbour and once was where the Procurement Association of the Danish Process used to keep their paper storage. So the name Paper Island is rather fitting! With these big halls empty over the years the concept of the Copenhagen Street Food came into fruition in 2014. And what an awesome idea it was. In the last few years, a bridge has been built linking Paper Island to both Christianshavn and Central Copenhagen.

It’s a beautiful spot in the harbour opposite The Royal Playhouse and Nyhavn and next to the Opera House. It’s in very good creative company. Within the old halls and smaller buildings, there is a creative space which has a current exhibition from Yoko Ono, offices, cafes and The Copenhagen Street Food. Whilst the Street Food opened in 2014 and they had to wait till 2016 for the bridge linking it to central Copenhagen to be completed. The bridge like most of Copenhagen has a cycle lane so make sure you are walking in the right place so you don’t get mowed down by the cyclists!

Part of Yoko Ono art piece

The main pull for Paper Island is the street food and trust me it’s well worth a visit. The place is huge! There is a substantial selection of food covering all cuisines from the four corners of the globe. You can get main meals, selections of sides, the naughtiest of sweet treats, great beers, cocktails and juices.

There is a nice outdoor section which would be bliss on a beautiful sunny day overlooking the harbour. The beaches and tables outside are all communal and there are shipping containers which double as eating areas and seating platforms. Some of the seating areas are also positioned around huge fire pits which on the day we visited were much needed! Even being a chilly day with the sky threatening to rain the outside areas were packed with tourists and locals alike. It is the place to be.


As soon as you walk into the big factory shed it’s like walking into a travel food heaven. There is more communal benches inside and even some ‘restaurant’ style set ups with tables that you actually book in advance. We opted for the communal benches and some poor chaps had us staring (sorry salivating) at their food while we were trying to decide if we go Chinese, Thai or Mexican. Playing on the industrial feel there were rooftop style areas built upon shipping containers, benches and tables made out of old oil drums and milk cartons, some handy work was made with pallets and they were fashioned into tables and benches. Danish Architecture at its finest.

All of the food stalls had such brilliant designs. My favourite was this pancake stall. The roof was made of old egg cartons! All of the designs worked well together to create fabulous space.


Some of what we eat and drank included below and spoiler alert it was all DELICIOUS


Chicken Penang
Chicken pad Thai
Pizza slices
Nachos
Burrito
Raspberry mojito, passion fruit mojito and strawberry mojito- maybe we had a few too many mojitos
Whisky sour
Apple cider and beers
Decadent chocolate mousse

And the things at the topped it for the boys was .. a delicious creme brûlée doughnut. They are still talking about how amazing it was!

The easiest way to reach is across the Inderhavnsbro bridge at the end of Nyhavn or if you are in Christianshavn then it’s only a short walk from the canals.

If you’re not hungry (and trust me you will be once you get there and the smells hit you) it’s still worth a visit to see what it’s all about and take in the views around the harbour. We didn’t find it overly pricey but it’s still Copenhagen so expect to pay more than you would in the UK.

More details including opening times and the specific food stalls can be found here


Globetrotters – Old School Traveller

Woohoo it’s Sunday so that means it’s time to introduce you to another Globetrotter.

The first blog post I read from the Old School Traveller was the first of their 5 part series called A Singular Honeymoon. I loved it! Why do you need to be married if you want the honeymoon experience now? It reminded me of when Carrie ‘married herself’ and gift registered for herself in Sex in The City after spending me a $ on engagement presents, wedding presents, baby showers and baby gifts. Whilst this wasn’t the thinking behind having a singular honeymoon  it was more about having that experience even if a honeymoon wasn’t in the near future. What I also liked was that he set himself the rule that he wasn’t allowed to say no to anything. I personally think all adventures should be like this.  The Old School Traveller is now married and his wife has a style section on the blog.

On the blog, you will find help with travel booking, restaurant guides, travel inspo, travel stories and the new addition of the style section. Links will be below to the blog and social channel so you can see for yourself.

The imagery of his words, the quality content, the images all just convey a beautiful sense of  an old school romance for travelling and seeing the world- so let me hand you over to The Old School Traveller.


A little bit about me, I trained in Fine Art as an Oil Painter, which I still am, but soon moved into photography and became a ‘Celebrity’ shooter for postcard and poster printers in the 80’s. After a bit of a mishap, I moved home to Wales and got into the hospitality industry, running a pub in Wales where I was also the chef, cellar man and host, and then ran a 22 bedroom hotel near Cambridge in England. Here, my cooking levels increased as did my interest in both food and wine. After this, I became an actor and comedy writer in Bristol, before moving to Australia to become a Television Executive. Due to the unbearable type of people I was meeting I got out and set up my own graphics business and started to travel extensively back and forth to Europe in particular but also to Asia and America. I am well past 1 million airmails and with three trips to Europe a year from Brisbane, I can’t see that slowing down anytime soon. During the last year or so, I have decided to put my travel experiences, my love of food and wine, my back catalogue of photographs and my sense of humour to better use, and I’m now focussing on travel/food blogging…. and here I am, OST.

What do you enjoy most about travelling?
Having spent the first half of my life in Europe and the second in Australia, I love going home. Australia is it’s own paradise but I find I need to get my fix of the ever changing face of architecture, art, cuisine, dialect and scenery that Europe offers. I’m a Europhile no doubt. Ultimately I love beauty, whether it be in scenery, in the joy of wonderful food and wine or simply the smell of wild thyme on a Greek hillside. Ultimately though, seeing the joy on my partner’s face when she experiences something incredible and that she never thought she would be part of, makes everything worthwhile. It’s these images that stay with me – of her, my, our happiness. It’s something I’ve noticed out there in ‘blogland’; the sheer lack of true happiness in the images. More a postcard than a love letter.

Why do you think travelling is important?
Travelling broadens the mind for sure, but I feel it’s truly about finding your home from home. Those places that just welcome you and make you feel as if you truly belong. I’m not after wild adventure, I’ve had enough of that in my life. I’m more interested in happiness, relaxation and the understanding of inner self. I find that the older you become, the more you appreciate that that’s being lost and the desire to just .. be.

What is your favourite photograph from your travels?



That’s a tough one as I have about 200,000 to choose from, but I think this one from Folegandros. I just woke up from an afternoon nap and took it from bed. The light and composition and that it’s also fairly unusual, speaks to me quite a lot.

Which is your favourite – sun, snow, sea, city, mountains, country?
Sun – Greece. The ever-changing light, bright colours, the beautiful Aegean, the crisp whites and hospitality. Snow – The Swiss Alps. They just know how to do it and everything works perfectly under extreme conditions. You need ‘reliable’ when travelling through Winter. Sea – Italy. The whole coast of Italy is a delight, including some wonderfully islands, both secluded and popular. And again, that light, especially around the bay of Naples.

Who do you usually travel with?
I spent pretty much 15 years travelling on my own but now with my wife. She is an incredible traveller. Easy going, happy to do other things (shop) while I write or take my photos, or to just join in. She came late to European travel and has embraced my love for it with open arms, and it’s truly a sharing experience now. Each trip is usually one of my favourite places that I want us to share, one that she, Kati, wants to see, and one that’s new to both of us. It works.

If you were to give one piece of travel advice what would it be?

Save as much money as you can on flights and hotels to be able to spend the money on luxuries elsewhere. The Airport transfer, for example, is something that I couldn’t afford when I was younger but is now crucial to a relaxing trip. Lugging baggage around, waiting for buses, taxi’s etc and not knowing where you’re going cause a lot of stress between travelling couples. For example, getting to Naples airport from Positano. Paying for the private transfer allowed us to experience the incredible coastal road, we got to stop off at Pompeii for two hours with our luggage safely in the car and then on to catch our flight. No stress and it meant that we didn’t have to go out and back to Pompeii and use up a whole day getting there and back. So airport transfers…… and earplugs on flights. Crucial. Even keep them in when watching movies. Eradicates white noise and fellow travellers and you arrive so much more refreshed, less tired, less stressed and less prone to jet lag.

Tell us the funniest story or a mishap from one of your adventures?
You’ll have to read that here.  It involved Ouzo and a boat load of Honeymooners.

Where is your favourite place that you’ve been to?
Right now, Milos Island in the Cyclades. It’s our secret. It’s a wonderfully small and unspoilt little gem. Like the Greek Islands used to be before the ‘too big’ cruise ships and tourism ruined the more obvious islands. It’s like they have seen how the other islands have been spoiled and have laid the groundwork for a great trip as was. Empty beaches, old school Tavernas, wonderful seafood, great geology, amazing sunsets, friendly locals, pristine and about a quarter of the price of Mykonos/Santorini… It has everything, and it’s the reason that we fell in love with the Greek Islands all those years ago. It is truly a magical place that I thought had gone….and very much Old School Traveller.

Tell us one place/experience on your bucket list?
The next trip, always. Seville, Jerez and Cadiz have always been on the list and I finally get to cross them off, but we’re also going to Bologna, and as true foodie and cook, my grin will be the widest there. Italy after all, is my spiritual home and if Italy’s stomach doesn’t bring the widest smile to my face, nowhere will.

To see more from The Old School Traveller you can find them here

Blog

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Pinterest Old School Traveller

Viewbug Old School Traveller

Forget your year 6 school trip experiences here is 10 reasons to visit Canberra now

My sister has lived in lots of places both in Australia and overseas over her lifetime. She lived in our rural country town,  experienced the bright lights of Sydney, spent a semester in Sweden, lived in the midlands of the UK  and she even lived in the Italian Alps for a year when she didn’t know a word of Italian.  Her husband and she relocated from Birmingham a few years ago (he had never been to Australia and yet moved without hesitation- but that is another story for another day) and after a brief stint staying back with the parents, they made the move to Canberra.  Yes, Canberra. You can probably hear me roll my eyes when I say this.

I seriously don’t mean any disrespect to Canberra or its residents but really my only memories are of  school trips, roundabouts so many roundabouts, stopping for a Macca’s on the way to my grandparents on the way to the coast or a brief end of school girls trip when we weren’t even really old enough to do anything fun so just shopped and visited Telecom tower.  I also slightly resent Canberra as a whole as it’s close to Mum and Dad so they spend a lot of time there visiting my sister.  I know the inner 16-year-old version of myself is coming out.

My sister, however, has been constantly trying to encourage my other half and I to 1)move home and 2) move to Canberra.   I even got a Canberra tea towel from her one birthday as if that could tempt me further.  Nice try Sissy.

In her bid to promote Canberra as a place I could move to I asked her to send over 10 reasons why people should visit Canberra.

If you aren’t familiar with Canberra it is the capital city of Australia and located in the Australian Capital Territory. Australia has only two territories and these are the ACT and the Northern Territory (NT). It’s home to Parliament House, National War Museum and was a purpose built capital city that lies directly equal distances between Sydney and Melbourne.

So here are Canberra’s Best Bits according to my Sissy..

1.     It’s the bush capital


Canberra strikes a great balance between having all the amenities and convenience of cities but a small population and large open spaces.  Within a five minutes drive of her high-density apartment complex,  she can be in the bush with no sign of development.

If you want a true bush experience there is the Canberra Nature Park (30+ separate areas) across Canberra allowing you to walk and hike in the bush.  Plus you can hike up Mount Ainslie, Black Mountain or Red Hill for great views of the city.  And if you’re really keen, there are plenty of bushwalks just outside of Canberra (such as Mount Tennent or Mount Painter). If you’re keen to see Australian wildlife, it is pretty much guaranteed at Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve.

2.     It may not be on the water
Unlike most Australian states and capital territories, Canberra isn’t located on the coast.  However, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t any water fun to be had.  In the middle of Canberra is Lake Burley Griffin neatly dividing Canberra into south and north (with a fairly competitive rivalry to accompany it).

There are also smaller lakes in the some of the Canberra districts – Lake Ginninderra (Belconnen), Gungahlin Pond and Yerrabi Pond (Gungahlin) and Lake Tuggeranong.

There’s also plenty of swimming locations.   Casuarina Sands (swimming in the Murrumbidgee River) is highly recommended but there is also Uriarra Crossing, Kambah Pool, Cotter Dam/River, Gibraltar Creek (with some nice waterfalls) and other spots to be discovered.

3.     It encourages an active lifestyle
Due to the large open spaces, Canberra encourages an active lifestyle.  Not only are there cycling tracks all around the lakes, there are plenty of shared off-road paths and on-road bike lanes linking the main areas of Canberra.  And if you get tired, all the buses come equipped with bike carriers so you can just get the bus home!

You can also row, sail, kayak, stand-up paddle board on the water and cycle, walk or Segway on the 40km path surrounding Lake Burley Griffin.

4.Seasonal experiences
It’s a rarity in Australian states and territory capital cities (excluding Melbourne with its four seasons in one day and Tasmania) that all seasons are fully experienced in Canberra. What’s even better are the events that accompany the seasons.  No matter when you travel to Canberra, there is likely to be something on.

Summer events
Summer kicks off with Christmas markets and light displays.
Canberra holds the world record for largest number of Christmas lights on a residential home and also the world record for most Christmas lights on an artificial Christmas tree.
Canberra has a free New Years Eve concert and fireworks (though don’t expect them to be anything like Sydney’s).
Free Australia Day concert
Multicultural festival – three-day event that is massive – sort of like Tumbafest on a bigger scale with daytime drinking encouraged
Ignore Summernats – highly recommend avoiding Canberra on this weekend

Autumn events


Autumn may not be what you expect – in March the days are still warm (often getting up to 30 degrees) with cool nights. From late April (Anzac day onwards) the temperature drops, but the days are generally sunny and bright.
Enlighten and the Night Noodle market in March
Canberra Day – public holiday – second Monday in March
SkyFire – Random Saturday night of fireworks over the lake – in March
Balloon Spectacular – nine days balloon festival near Lake Burley Griffin – in March
Anzac dawn service at Australian War Memorial
Canberra District Wine Harvest

Winter events
Truffle Festival
Sports – rugby union, rugby league, AFL GWS
Corin Forest – skiing, snowboarding, sledging and snow activities 45 minutes from Canberra
Ski fields  – the best ski fields in Australia are less than three hours from Canberra

Spring events
Floriade
Night Fest (part of Floriade – comedy shows, drinks, music, cooking demonstrations and imaginative light display
Canberra Nara Candle Festival – Nara (Japan) is the sister city of Canberra – over 2000 candles with Japanese music and other Japanese-themed events
Oktoberfest

5.     Markets
In addition to your typical shopping centres, Canberra has thriving markets.  You can get your food for the week or crafts and clothing.
*Old Bus Depot (weekly) – has food, clothes, craft, art etc
*Hall markets (monthly)
*Canberra Handmade markets (quarterly) – the very best products from independent designers, artisans, craftspeople and gourmet food makers. Categories include – Art & Photography, Skincare & Grooming, Things for Children, Fashion, Food, Homewares & Textiles, Jewellery & Accessories, Paper & Craft, Furniture, Pets and Christmas.
*EPIC Farmers Markets – every type of produce you could imagine.

6.     Dinner and drinks
When we used to go to Canberra as a teenager, we always ended up eating in  Manuka as that was the “Canberra eating area”.  Thankfully, (and while Manuka still has good restaurants) Canberra is undergoing a transformation and other areas have developed.

*Braddon has led the trend of hip and quirky nightlife.
*The Bentspoke Brewery brew all their beer and cider on the premises – they have up to 18 different beers on tap at any time.
*The Hamlet – Food truck venue and bring your own alcohol (with a bottle shop conveniently across the road)
*Mandalay Bus – Canberra institution
*Frugii Dessert Laboratory – amazing ice cream in a strange variety of flavours
*Grease Monkey – used to be a mechanic shop, now does amazing burgers

In addition to Braddon, Kingston Foreshore, New Acton and Civic are highly recommended spots for great food.

If you’re in the mood for a pub experience, the Old Canberra Inn is the oldest pub in Canberra and predates Canberra itself by over 50 years (although it was a home for a large amount of that time).  It’s an amazing old building that is very cosy and does amazing food.  It only serves craft beers and always has different beers on tap.

Canberra has also joined the trend of concealed, laneway bars.  Molly is an amazing underground (literally) whisky bar, Suke Suke is a Japanese cocktail bar that’s also underground (and down a dodgy looking lane), Highball Express is a Cuban themed bar up a fire escape and unlike most laneway bars is very airy and spacious, Hippo Co is another whisky bar, Bar Rochford has a lovely open fire in the winter.

7. Breakfast
The most important meal of the day and you’re bound to be impressed by the breakfast and coffee available in Canberra.  A Canberran barista has won the Australian Barista Championships for the past two years.

The freakshake trend started in Canberra at Patissez who incidentally do amazing ricotta pancakes.  Another place where you can get a side serve of diabetes with your breakfast is Ricardo’s – their display cabinet is a rainbow coloured delight.  The Cupping Room does great breakfasts and quite often has a queue outside the front door.

8.The iconic Canberra experience

Forget about your year six excursion to Canberra, some of the main tourist spots are fascinating.

The Australian War Memorial is incredible and depressing; Questacon is just as fun as when you were a teenager (and I highly recommend the adult only nights – science and alcohol!?); the National Gallery of Australia currently has Treasures from the Palace of Versailles on display; there is a lot to see in Canberra and you may as well roll down the hill at Parliament House while you can (they’re building a fence).

9. Jervis Bay
Jervis Bay has the most amazing beaches in Australia and the world.  Part of Jervis Bay belongs to the Australian Capital Territory so that the capital has access to the sea.  The Booderee National Park is part of the Jervis Bay Territory has truly incredible beaches and campsites.  Murray’s Beach is probably and all time favourite beach.

10. She lives there and its closer to home than I am currently
Do I need any other reasons??

Wine on Waiheke 


On Waiheke Island you MUST drink 🍷 at one of the many vineyards.  Surpringly for such a smal island there is a lot of wineries. We caught the ferry over from Auckland so had a lovely day exploring and found ourselves settling in at Goldie Estate for a wine with a view. 
Goldies is one of the first vineyards on Waiheke and we learnt that when the original owners retired and their children didn’t want to take over they gave the vineyard to the University of Auckland for Wine Science. 

They had a lovely setting and cellar door set up with wines and cheeses. Such a relaxed atmosphere and we were able to try a few different wines before settling on our favourite. You can sit out on benches, cushions right next to the vines or take your wine and sit up on the hill over looking the picturesque Putiki Bay. 

Beautiful setting, amazing wine (especially the Rose) and the views. Just divine 👌

My Little Kitchen

One of the best things of being away is doing things that you don’t normally do. On our recent trip back to Australia my partner and I got up at 5am each morning and went for a walk along the golden Gold Coast beaches. At home we would always enjoy a lie in but the sun is up so early in Queensland we didn’t want to waste a second. We would then on our way back home stop and have breakfast. I’m not going to lie one of those breakfast dates did happen at Macca’s. Don’t make that face- we were on holiday and hotcakes are my WEAKNESS!

But then on one of our ‘breakfast dates’ we came across a lovely little place called My Little Kitchen. Located just off the beach in Broadbeach it had a beach vibe and decor to suit.

My sister and her husband opted to join us on this morning so we all had high hopes of a yummy breakfast. They had a small selection of tables outside with a bigger area inside. Obviously most people opted for outside which is what we did. They boasted great coffee but as none of us drank coffee I can’t comment on it. What I can comment on is there amazing smoothies!

I had the Very Berry Blast and it was possibly the best smoothie I have ever had berries, yogurt, almond milk and ginger. The right pick me up for early mornings. I could literally dink this smoothie every day of my life.  The deliciousness didn’t stop there. We tried a few things off the menu- my partner and brother in law had the eggs beni, my sister had the DIY breakfast board and I had the Caramel Belgium Waffles. All are thoroughly recommended and were delish! For a look at other things they have on the menu you can find here http://www.mylittlekitchenbroadbeach.com.au/mlkmainmenu

It was so good that I also had lunch there the very next day. We had tapas which isn’t on their online menu.  I am not sure if that is a regular lunch option or not but it was available when we visited. We had the most amazing squid and prawns. Team those up with the smoothie mentioned above and I would be set for the rest of my life. Almost 2 months on and I still am thinking about them.

On both visits the service was great and welcoming. The only down side is that the bathrooms are shared with a hotel next door and it all just felt a little odd. Other than that the decor was relaxed, great artwork (by a local artist) on the walls which is also for sale and the food played to all the senses.

For the Gold Coast the prices were reasonable however the exchange rate to pounds did push it into the higher breakfast bracket. Another issue that we found in both Australia and NZ is that some places add on a public holiday surcharge to bill and this can range from 10%-20%. As we were away from the 23rd December to 10th of Jan we did seem to have a hell of a lot of public holidays. Something to bear in mind if you are travelling to these countries over the festive season.

If you find yourself on the Gold Coast then make sure you do stop by its a great little find and trust me you won’t regret it.

 

For more info – http://www.mylittlekitchenbroadbeach.com.au/

 

 

Hidden Gem- The Subhouse, Wells UK

Its been a bank holiday weekend here in the UK (exactly the same as Public Holiday just a more British way of saying it) and my other half and I went and enjoyed a day in Wells.

Wells is in the South West of England and is home to the Wells Cathedral, Bishops Palace, markets and is also where the film Hot Fuzz was filmed.  We live just down the road so it was bit of being a tourist in your own area type of day.

My other half had been told about a newish restaurant and we thought we should check it out for lunch. And oh my was this suggestion a good one.

You wouldn’t have known it was there walking down the street kinda like one of the secret bars that keep popping up everywhere. Locate in an all old sub station on a very unassuming street opposite a hideous night club and next to a car wash was the black door that took you to meat heaven.

The atmosphere, décor and communal seating  had been cleverly thought out and all made you feel comfortable, relaxed and like your at home just with way better food.  The staff added to this and we had fantastic service.

The food is mostly burgers, wings, ribs, sticky, saucey and pure delish. My other half opted for the biggest burger on the menu (thinking it may cure his hangover)  and I had a spicy chicken wrap. Both of these were amazing. Super tasty, full of flavours and just  hit the spot. They stock a lot of craft beers and ciders which due to aforementioned hangovers we didn’t try. I did however have a Bounty Hunter milk shake which came with the added bonus of a bounty bar (big thumbs up from me).

Upstairs they have a bar which I am assuming they have for the evening and two games rooms one had Mario Kart on and the other had a foosball table. Beautifully quirky! After speaking to some friends I’ve also heard they do amazing cocktails so will need to go back one evening and give these a try.

Everything was reasonably priced and between the two of us cost under £25.

If  happen to find yourself in this lovely little city then make sure you stop by The Subhouse. Who knows we might be sat on the table next to you- I’ll  be the one with the pink carnation

 

Check them out here- http://www.thesubhouse.co.uk